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ehrailway's Journal

Name:
Edinburgh & Hawick Railway
Location:
Website:
Membership:
Moderated
Posting Access:
All Members , Moderated
Description:
Railway from Hawick to Arniston Engine.
Even before the North British Railway had obtained its Act authorising the acquisition of the Edinburgh & Dalkeith Railway, John Learmonth had instructed John Miller to carry out a survey of the territory to the south of Dalkeith for a potential line to Kelso which would connect with a branch from Berwick. The scheme, which would have resulted in a 52-mile (84km) line to Hawick from the Edinburgh & Dalkeith Railway's terminus at Dalhousie Mains, was discussed at a shareholders' meeting on 19th December, 1844, where it drew criticism for being almost as long as the NBR's Berwick line. Learmonth described the line as a 'protective' one to guard against incursions by the NBR's Glasgow-based rival, the Caledonian Railway, and stated that there was no intention of extending it further to Carlisle. The proposal was carried by a substantial majority and the Act authorising the line was obtained on 21st July, 1845, with the incorporation of the Edinburgh & Hawick Railway. Although nominally independent, £400,000 of the company's capital was subscribed by NBR directors, and the shares, each bearing a 4% guarantee, were to be transferred to NBR shareholders after incorporation. A special shareholders' meeting on 18th August, 1845, authorised the raising of a further £400,000, which would be used to buy out the Edinburgh & Hawick company. At the same time, Learmonth revealed that it was in fact intended to extend the railway to Carlisle.

The line would first be extended to Galashiels by paying £1,200 to buy out the independent Galashiels Railway project. The line to Hawick was to be the greatest and most costly of the North British Railway's lines. From Dalhousie, it climbed at 1-in-70 for 8 miles (13km) up the valleys of the River South Esk and the Gore Water to reach a 900-foot (270m) summit at Falahill, before dropping down by the Gala Water which it crossed fifteen times before reaching Galashiels. Beyond Galashiels, the line passed over undulating terrain through the Tweed Valley and below the Eildon Hills to Melrose, St Boswells and finally Hawick. Construction was already underway in June 1846 when the company obtained authorisation to build seven branch lines: four from its Berwick line and three from the Hawick line. The Edinburgh & Hawick Railway opened on 1st November, 1849.

Down
MilesLocationConnections
0Hawick (1849 station)Trailing connection from Border Union Railway
-Hawick Shed
Hassendean
Belses
-Kelso JunctionTrailing connection from Kelso Branch
12¼St. Boswells
15½Melrose
-
Tweedbank
19¼Galashiels (1849 station)
-Galashiels (2015 station)
23Bowland
-Bowshank Tunnel
26Stow
30¼FountainhallTrailing connection from Lauder Light Railway
33½Heriot
-
Falahill Summit
36¾Tynehead
-Borthwick Bank
40Fushiebridge
40¾Gorebridge
41¾Arniston EngineEnd-on connection to Marquis of Lothian's Waggonway

Up
MilesLocationConnections
0Arniston EngineEnd-on connection from Marquis of Lothian's Waggonway
1Gorebridge
Fushiebridge
-Borthwick Bank
5Tynehead
-Falahill Summit
Heriot
11½FountainhallFacing connection to Lauder Light Railway
15¾Stow
-Bowshank Tunnel
18¾Bowland
-Galashiels (2015 station)
22½Galashiels (1849 station)
-Tweedbank
26¼Melrose
29½St. Boswells
-Kelso JunctionFacing connection to Kelso Branch
34Belses
37½Hassendean
-Hawick Shed
41¾Hawick (1849 station)Facing connection to Border Union Railway
arniston engine, belses, borthwick bank, bowland, bowshank tunnel, edinburgh and hawick railway, falahill summit, fountainhall, fushiebridge, galashiels, gorebridge, hassendean, hawick, heriot, melrose, north british railway, railways, st. boswells, stow, trains, tweedbank, tynehead

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